Quasi Laboratory mode Shakespeare’s sonnets Dissection

– on a Bernadette Mayer like Experiment –

« Quot Euclidis discipulos retrojecit Elefuga quasi scopulos eminens et abruptus »

Richard de Bury Philiobiblion

Purpose:
In this lab, we will in a laboratory mode dissect two Shakespeare’s sonnets in order to observe the external and internal structures of a poem and a poem, i.e. Shakespeare’s sonnets anatomy poem and poem poems which will be anatomized in anatomic slant truth shoes. And the internal is internal external to external internal. (1)

Ι

Put on safety goggles, gloves, and a lab apron.(1)

II

Place your Shakespeare’s sonnets (18-116) on a dissection tray. To determine the sex, look at the hand digits, or fingers, on its forelegs.

III

The central nervous system (1) of the sonnets Shakespeare’s sonnets in particular in-particularity consists of the lexical opus corpus, which is enclosed in the skull, and the spinal cord, which in turn is enclosed in the backbone or the acrosti(c)-his, acrostihis. Nerves branch out from the spinal cord and give the characteristic rhyme to the sonnets. The poems’ skeletal and muscular systems consist of their semantic bones and joints, to which nearly all the voluntary verse of the body are attached. Voluntary verse, that are those over which the poem has control, occur in pairs of rhymes. When a flexor rhyme of a leg or other body part contracts, that part is bent to esoteric infinity and then to infinite disorientation. When the extensor verse of that body part contracts, the part straightens and extends to «Omnia quae sunt, Lumina sunt » (Johannes Scotus Eriugena). (2)

The sounds of the new sonnet species poems during dissection are heuristic and are either superficial like this

or triumphant and «Ave, Imperator, morituri te salutant» mode like this

Quid velit et possit rerum concordia discors —

What the discordant harmony of circumstances would and could effect.

Horace Epistles Book I, epistle xii, line 19.

IV

We also dissected the quasi laboratory poems’ lexical corpora corporum by stripping their lexical burden lexical and by stripping off all pseudo- sonnet manifestos in word forms beginning with ‘s’ in the aforementioned two in the long past of the chronic horizon of this horrible restaurant you ate last time Shakespeare’s sonnets. Greeeeen Vomit has ERUPTED and covered the formalistic beauty of meaning with pain and loss

We however proceeded in systematically systematizing our systematic approach which consisted in statistically measuring the significance of burden in the laboratory dissected two Shakespeare’s sonnet products .Our results are shown in the following Tables —

Table 1

Sonnet 18 Words with “s” of stanza words and total

Stanza 1 5 words / (of) 32

Stanza 2 3 words / (of)28

Stanza 3 4 words / (of)32

Stanza 4 3 words / (of)20

Total 15 words / (of)110

Table 2

Sonnet 18 Words with “s” of stanza words and total

Stanza 1 0 words / (of)28

Stanza 2 2 words / (of)32

Stanza 3 1 words / (of)36

Stanza 4 0 words / (of)16

Total 3 words / (of)112

V

Despite the almost equal size of lexical corpus the stripping experiment had quite different effects in their lexical burden, which points to an absence of vocabulary regularity vocabulary in the sonnets. The Rhyming scheme of sonnet 18 suffered but almost survived by our aleatory interventions, and by our deregulating liberating consistent slavery was clsosely destroyed, while sonnet’s 116 remained almost intact , seeming that is seemingly intact seeming.

Blame it to Love or in that there was never too much regular similarity, or comfort zone regularity or whatever normality we can in any case imagine of any kind or non kind.

It does not appear that any consistent semantic or consistent aesthetic or inconsistent semantic and aesthetic results for that matter have been produced by our method. And it strangely seems that the opposite of a Kage’s anaxiomatic axiom here applies , yet without confidence but with some reliance in a non congenial belief

“The first question I ask myself when something doesn’t seem to be beautiful is why do I think it’s not beautiful. And very shortly you discover that there is no”

Beauty is pertaining whatever you do to destroy it.

(1) There has been extensive use of non semantic use content by http://www.biologyjunction.com/frog_dissection.htm

(2) http://books.google.gr/books?id=zjaml7PlUbwC&pg=RA2-PA33&lpg=RA2-PA33&dq=lumina+sunt&source=bl&ots=J…

Shakespeare sonnets Follow :

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? (Sonnet 18)
William Shakespeare, 1564 – 1616
( Form with the words beginning with «s in Bold)

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate;
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date;

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
–William Shakespeare

Sonnet 18 ( New form)

I compare thee to a day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate;
Rough winds do the darling buds of May,
And lease hath all too a date;

too hot the eye of heaven,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;

But thy eternal not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
Nor Death brag thou wander’st in his,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:

long as men can breathe or eyes can,
long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
–William Shakespeare

http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/shall-i-compare-thee-summers-day-sonnet-18

Let me not to the marriage of true minds (Sonnet 116)

( Form with the words beginning with «s: in Bold)

William Shakespeare, 1564 – 1616

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

Admit impediments. Love is not love

Which alters when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove:

O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,

That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

It is the star to every wandering bark,

Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.

Love ’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

Within his bending sickle’s compass come;

Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

If this be error, and upon me prov’d,

I never writ, nor no man ever lov’d.

Let me not to the marriage of true minds ( New Sonnet 116)

William Shakespeare, 1564 – 1616

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

Admit impediments. Love is not love

Which alters when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove:

O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,

That looks on tempests and is never;

It is the to every wandering bark,

Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.

Love ’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

Within his bending compass come;

Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

But bears it out even to the edge of doom.

If this be error, and upon me prov’d,

I never writ, nor no man ever lov’d.

http://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/let-me-not-marriage-true-minds-sonnet-116

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